Keynote Speakers

Tony Birch

Tony Birch

Tony Birch is the author of the books Shadowboxing (2006), Father's Day (2009), Blood (2011), shortlisted for the Miles Franklin literary award, and The Promise (2014). His new novel, Ghost River, will be released in October 2015. Both his fiction and nonfiction has been published widely in literary magazines and anthologies, both in Australia and internationally. He is currently the the inaugural Bruce McGuinness Research Fellow within the Moondani Balluk Centre at Victoria University.

Carolyn Dinshaw

Carolyn Dinshaw

Carolyn Dinshaw has been interested in the relationship between past and present ever since she began to study medieval literature. Her 1982 dissertation, subsequently published as Chaucer and the Text in 1988, explored the relevance of new critical modes for older literature, while in her 1989 book, Chaucer's Sexual Poetics, she investigated the connection of past and present via the Western discursive tradition of gender. In Getting Medieval: Sexualities and Communities, Pre- and Postmodern (1999), she traced a queer desire for history. In her most recent book, How Soon is Now? Medieval Texts, Amateur Readers, and the Queerness of Time (2012), she looks directly at the experience of time itself, as it is represented in medieval works and as it is experienced in readers of those works. In the classroom, she regularly teaches materials past and present, in courses ranging from Medieval Misogyny to Queer New York City.

Rita Felski

Rita Felski

Rita Felski’s primary interest is in rethinking questions of theory and interpretation. Her most recent book is on the hermeneutics of suspicion as mood and method and her new research is on what she calls “technologies of attachment”— how and why we become attached to works of art. She also has longstanding interests in feminism, theories of modernity, and genre (especially tragedy). Her specialities are Methodology, Literary Theory, Comparative Literature, and Cultural Studies. Forthcoming and recent books include The Limits of Critique (University of Chicago, 2015), Comparison: Theories, Approaches, Uses, co-edited with Susan Stanford Friedman (Johns Hopkins UP, 2013), Rethinking Tragedy (Johns Hopkins UP, 2008) and Uses of Literature (Wiley-Blackwell, 2008). Other books include Literature after Feminism (University of Chicago, 2003) and Doing Time (New York UP, 2000).

Susan Martin

Sue Martin

Sue Martin teaches Australian and Victorian literature and culture, and is a specialist in nineteenth-century Australian fiction. She is currently Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) in the College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce at La Trobe University in Melbourne. She has worked on women’s writing; spatial theory; garden history/culture; Victorian fiction, and book history. Recent books include Colonial Dickens: What Australians Made of the World’s Favourite Writer (Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2012) and Sensational Melbourne: Reading, Sensation Fiction and Lady Audley’s Secret in the Victorian Metropolis (ASP, 2011), both with Kylie Mirmohamadi, and Reading the Garden: The Culture of Gardening in Australia (Melbourne UP, 2008), with Mirmohamadi and Katie Holmes.

Last reviewed: 3 March, 2015